Learning Resources (581 items)To section archive

Latest items
Summer is approaching, and thanks to the vaccine rollout, travel restrictions in Europe are, in many places, being eased — at least somewhat. It is clear, though, that virtual tours and online exploration of cultural heritage will continue to play a major role in our “travel” experience. Museums and heritage sites are grappling with how to move forward into the post (or waning) pandemic period with a hybrid on on-site and on-line offers. Last year, early in the pandemic, we posted links to many virtual tours and presentations. Here are two more that have been created and posted online in recent months. Both are in Poland and are particularly detailed, providing extensive information that combine text and visuals, as well as links to external videos.
Published: 2021
Updated: Jul. 01, 2021
Tisha B’Av is the Jewish fast day mourning the many tragedies that befell the Jewish people on this date, most significantly, the destruction of the First and Second Beit Hamikdash (Temples). Tisha B’Av is preceded by a period of three weeks of mourning, with even further restrictions taking place the nine days immediately before the fast. Below is a collection of Tisha B’Av lesson plans, videos, and articles created by The Lookstein Center staff or contributed to the site by Jewish educators.
Published: 2021
Updated: Jul. 01, 2021
The school year is coming to a close in the northern hemisphere, and in-class parties (to the extent they are not on Zoom) have begun. A sine qua non is food, of course. But the typical end-of-year rituals include more than just treats: award ceremonies, outdoor fun in the fresh air, time capsules (lots of pandemic memories to store away for a later date), a recap of the past year, or sharing of summer plans. A Hebrew teacher in one of my schools ended the year in a most atypical way. She used the last week of school to continue teaching…but with games. Here are three of her favorites and the reasons why these games were my favorites too–even though I was only invited to observe, never to play.
Published: 2021
Updated: Jun. 22, 2021
This week, as the world prepares to mark International Holocaust Remembrance Day, a year after the COVID pandemic closed historical sites around the globe, Holocaust memorials, museums, and national and international institutions, are still challenged by the cancellation of perhaps the most iconic and resonant rituals of remembrance: gathering and commemorating at the actual sites where the mass murder was perpetrated. There’s been a flowering of innovative commemoration initiatives providing virtual access to memorial sites, and ways of commemorating from a distance via social media platforms and other online tools. Memorials and other Holocaust-related institutions intensified their activities on Zoom, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube most particularly between March and May, the period in which most of the Nazi camps were liberated 75 years ago.
Published: 2021
Updated: May. 11, 2021