Trends in Jewish Education (450 items)To section archive

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This issue looks at ways that school stakeholders experiment to use their time more effectively or in service of particular goals. Time is considered one of the “commonplaces” of education, something assumed to be as unchanging as the classroom walls and the sports field. There are the daily schedule, weekly schedules, and annual calendars; calendars for development, admissions, sports, assemblies, and more. And then COVID-19 burst into our lives, ripping up all of those calendars, throwing our best-laid plans out the window and challenging us to recreate them as best we can, in the eye of an ongoing storm.
Published: 2020
Updated: May. 13, 2020
Even though I do not possess medical knowledge, as a rabbi and social activist, I believe I can try to humbly prescribe ethical vaccines that can remedy jilted nerves and worried minds. My words are not meant to heal physically but to inspire spiritually. At this challenging time, it seems appropriate that those in the positions to (re)build confidence should do so. In that spirit, I am sharing thoughts on how we might be able to spiritually cope with the uncertain reality that has rapidly spread throughout the world. The coronavirus is not only a disease of the body, but also presents an existential crisis that has put governments, businesses and, most important, communities and individuals on edge.
Published: 2020
Updated: Mar. 20, 2020
Data-driven studies suggest that Holocaust education remains an area with much room for growth and improvement. Contemporary Holocaust education centers on several critical discussions: when to teach about the Holocaust, at what age, how much time to devote to its study in otherwise packed school days, and how best to tackle this difficult subject with primary (ages 5–11) and secondary (ages 11–17) students. The four books considered here all contribute to a growing literature on Holocaust education and make significant interventions in these central debates.
Published: 2020
Updated: Mar. 04, 2020
The dominant perception of Seymor Fox as a leader and institution builder, then, has overshadowed Fox’s intellectual work and it is here that Jonathan Cohen, one of Fox’s distinguished former doctoral students, has done a great service in putting together an anthology of Fox’s writings published by the Mandel Foundation in Israel and Keter Publishing. Cohen, a longtime faculty member at the Hebrew University, has served as Director of the Melton Center for Jewish Education, as well as head of the Hebrew University’s School of Education.
Published: 2020
Updated: Mar. 04, 2020