Informal Education (306 items)To section archive

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Indian play at North American Jewish summer camps offered three sets of overlapping lessons. First, by providing activities created and understood as respite from urban pressures, including donning and removing so-called primitive faux-tribal identities, camps reinforced Jewish urban, modernist values and virtues. Second, as Indian play recapitulated the colonial process that had displaced actual Indigenous people to make room for the White, European settlers—Jews included—it provided Jews a vehicle to perform assimilatory and nationalistic sentiments. Finally, playing Indian offered camp staff members techniques for imparting visceral and emotional engagement with forms of spirituality they thought campers could absorb, particularly ones that overlapped with Jewish notions of Creation.
Published: 2018
Updated: Jan. 30, 2019
Veteran staff members play a key role in a camp’s success. They preserve camp culture, maintain traditions, and serve important roles in the peer-training environment that camps depend on. It is not surprising, then, that camp counselor retention is important to the business of camping. This study focused on five counselors from Jewish camps in the United States, all of whom were about to return for a fourth summer. The research explored common phenomena of young adults’ experiences as counselors, how they made sense of their experiences, and their motivations for returning to camp. The data offer insights to camp directors interested in increasing counselor retention.
Published: 2018
Updated: Jan. 30, 2019
Given the centrality of Shabbat celebration to the weekly cycle of Jewish residential camps, it is surprising how little Shabbat-at-camp has been studied. This participant observational study of three American Jewish residential camps has focused on how Shabbat-at-camp is created and how the ritual celebrations engage the older campers.
Published: 2018
Updated: Jan. 27, 2019
The MOFET International Hebrew Writing Competition for 2019 has come to an exciting conclusion, with 165 entries that met the requirements of the competition. The entries were classified according to three age groups (preschoolers - preschool to grade 3, primary and middle schools, high schools, universities and adults). Each age group was divided into three levels of Hebrew, beginner level, intermediate level , and advanced level). The entries came from many countries: Austria, Ukraine, Argentina, USA, Denmark, Hong Kong, Japan, Israel, Mexico, France, South Korea, Canada and Russia.
Published: 2018
Updated: Jan. 10, 2019