Adult Education (101 items)To section archive

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The Council for Higher Education in Israel has set a goal to increase the number of Israelis of Ethiopian origin enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs. The initial target, which the council hopes to meet by 2020, is to increase the number of students from the community who are pursuing a bachelor’s degree to 1.7 percent of the student body, similar to their percentage in Israel’s overall population. Currently that rate stands at 1.54 percent, or 3,567 students. Only a tiny number of Ethiopian Israelis who have earned undergraduate degrees continue on to postgraduate degrees.
Published: 2019
Updated: Oct. 07, 2019
The paired study of the Jewish Talmud in havruta is a traditional, well-established and prestigious form of study. Havruta conversation is a confrontational speech event in which disagreements are not only expected but also appreciated. The aim of this study is to explore for the first time disagreement patterns carried out by women studying in havruta pairs. Twenty one havruta conversations were observed and recorded, and semi-structured in-depth interviews were held individually with the participants.
Published: 2018
Updated: Dec. 13, 2018
Most Jewish religious schools begin the day with a traditional morning prayer. After that, students spend much of their time studying Talmud, the central text of Jewish law. But at Romemu Yeshiva, set to open next year, students could begin the day with yoga and meditation, study Kabbalah or Jewish mysticism, then pore over Hasidic texts that afternoon. And some of those students may not even be Jews. When it begins its classes in the summer of 2019, Romemu Yeshiva will take its place among a constellation of intensive Jewish study programs for adults in New York City. But unlike other yeshivas, such as the Hadar Institute, Romemu will depart from a traditional focus on understanding and analyzing rabbinic texts. Romemu students will study Talmud and Jewish law, but their curriculum will also emphasize concepts like mindfulness, movement and mysticism.
Published: 2018
Updated: Dec. 13, 2018
A couple months ago, while preparing a staff retreat, one of my colleagues suggested that I lead a session on the why’s and how’s of Jewish learning at Moishe House. I have done Jewish learning as a student and a teacher, inside and outside of Moishe House, in Israel and elsewhere. But this made me realize I had never taken the time to formalize the attributes of Jewish learning at Moishe House. I knew that the session would give me the opportunity to confront and thicken my perception with my peers’ perspectives, so I jumped to the occasion.
Published: 2018
Updated: Aug. 29, 2018