Education & Administration (294 items)To section archive

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More than 30 leading Jewish thinkers and activists from around the world are convening in Jerusalem today to launch Our Common Destiny, a ground-breaking initiative created to strengthen the bonds among Jews worldwide. The project is a joint initiative of Genesis Philanthropy Group and the State of Israel, under the auspices of Israel’s President. Our Common Destiny strives to connect Jews to each other and to Israel across diverse religious and cultural identities through a shared set of ethics and values. This Forum runs Monday, September 9 through Wednesday, September 11, with scholars from six continents.
Published: 2019
Updated: Sep. 18, 2019
Free public education? Not really – Israeli households spent 26.5 billion shekels ($7.5 billion at current exchange rates) in 2018 covering school-related costs, a 15% increase over 2017 and equal to nearly 24% of the government’s spending on education. The figure – which was released by the Central Bureau of Statistics on Tuesday, less than two weeks before the next school year – covers a wide range of expenses including school books and other supplies, after-school groups, private lessons and university tuition.
Published: 2019
Updated: Sep. 11, 2019
Source: Religious and independent day schools in New York City will receive an additional $37.7 million in government funding for the upcoming school year as a result of a years-long effort spearheaded by the Jewish Education Project and a coalition of interfaith organizations. The recouped funding for Title I programs will help teachers and students at religious and independent schools in New York City access new educational resources and promote more opportunities for professional learning.
Published: 2019
Updated: Sep. 11, 2019
Philanthropic support for Jewish education, so much as it wants to address affordability, would be best served by working to realign the current incentive structure. The best way I can see to accomplish that is to stop giving money to Jewish schools. Let schools operate like any business and receive direct data from their end users via the most relevant economic signal – price. In a non-subsidized market, if there is demand for a no-frills education, a school will find a way to provide a no-frills education at a no-frills price. If there is demand for a luxury education, another school will provide the luxury education at a luxury price. But the school that can provide the best possible education at the lowest possible price will corner the market.
Published: 2019
Updated: Aug. 28, 2019