Approaches to Curriculum: The Journey from Preservice Training to Novice Teacher

Published: 
Aug. 07, 2016

Source: Journal of Jewish Education, 82:3, 208-230

 

In this longitudinal study, carried out over a period of 6 years, the curriculum approach of student-teachers in the fields of Jewish Studies (Bible Studies and Jewish Philosophy) was examined, from their 1st year of studies until their 6th year when they took their places as full-fledged teachers in schools. This article focuses on the student-teachers’ approaches to curriculum and the differences in their attitudes toward two formal study programs, that differ in character and essence. The major argument in this article is that the character and essence of a formal syllabus has great influence on curriculum approaches of students preparing to become teachers, and their place in developing their own teaching program.

Levi’s research questions were: What are student-teachers’ curricular approaches and are there any differences between their approach to Biblical Studies as opposed to their approach to Jewish Philosophy? Did any changes in the curricular approach of the student-teachers occur from the beginning of training to entering the classroom as teachers? If so, how can these changes be characterized?

The major argument in this article is that the content of a formal syllabus has great influence on curriculum approaches of students preparing to become teachers, and their place in developing their own teaching program.

Levi’s findings have led to her contention that more effective means must be found for preserving the sense of vision and purpose in student-teachers prior to becoming full-fledged teachers. Teacher training programs should focus on finding new strategies for training which opens the window for teachers to develop initiatives in curriculum design and delivery, and take greater responsibility in school life. Levi concludes that this approach would encourage teachers to maintain their ideological motivation and sense of mission, throughout the stages of their professional development, without losing it upon beginning their work as teachers.

Updated: Aug. 10, 2016
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